29 
May

ICC Cricket World Cup 2019

ICC Cricket World Cup 2019

It’s been a long time coming but it’s finally here. Yes, Theresa May is resigning. But before that, there’s the little matter of the Cricket World Cup 2019. This starts this week which, at least to sporting fans, is infinitely more interesting.

The UK will host this elite event through many venues across the country and excitement is already building.

The event has a long and varied history, having begun with three nations, England, Australia and South Africa in 1912, with England as the host. Sadly the tournament was not a success. For one, the weather was abysmal – the August of 1912 was recorded as the “coldest, dullest and wettest August of the 20th century”. Some might say typical English cricket weather.

A Very Brief History

The first of what is now accepted as the official Cricket World Cup was held in England in 1975 who hosted the four-yearly event for the next three tournaments. India and Pakistan were the hosts for 1987.

2019 will be the fifth time that England has hosted the tournament and as hosts, automatically qualify. The next seven spots belong to the top seven ODI ranking teams in the ICC, and for the last two spots, the ICC conducted a qualifying tournament for the remaining test playing nations in the world. West Indies and Afghanistan occupy those spots.

10 teams will face each other in a total of 45 games before the final stage of the tournament. The top four teams from the group stage will qualify for the semi-final as there are no quarter-finals for the 2019 Cricket World Cup. The two successful teams will then compete in the final on 14 July.

Venues and Stadiums

Venues are London, Birmingham, Southampton, Trent Bridge, Chester-Le-Street, Leeds, Nottingham, Cardiff, and Taunton. The stadiums are Lord’s, The Oval, Trent Bridge, Edgbaston Cricket Ground, Rose Bowl, Old Trafford, River Side Ground, County Cricket Ground, Headingley, and Sophia Gardens. So with some local and others televised there’s plenty of opportunity for themed catering events.

The schedule is as follows and makes June a veritable month of cricket.

  • May 30 England v South Africa
  • 31 West Indies v Pakistan
  • June 1 NZ v Sri Lanka; Afghanistan v Australia
  • 2 South Africa v Bangladesh
  • 3 England v Pakistan
  • 4 Afghanistan v Sri Lanka
  • 5 South Africa v India; Bangladesh v NZ
  • 6 Australia v West Indies
  • 7 Pakistan v Sri Lanka
  • 8 England v Bangladesh; Afghanistan v NZ
  • 9 India v Australia
  • 10 South Africa v West Indies
  • 11 Bangladesh v Sri Lanka
  • 12 Australia v Pakistan
  • 13 India v NZ
  • 14 England v West Indies
  • 15 Sri Lanka v Australia; South Africa v Afghanistan
  • 16 India v Pakistan
  • 17 West Indies v Bangladesh
  • 18 England v Afghanistan
  • 19 NZ v South Africa
  • 20 Australia v Bangladesh
  • 21 England v Sri Lanka
  • 22 India v Afghanistan; West Indies v NZ
  • 23 Pakistan v South Africa
  • 24 Bangladesh v Afghanistan
  • 25 England v Australia
  • 26 NZ v Pakistan
  • 27 West Indies v India
  • 28 Sri Lanka v South Africa
  • 29 Pakistan v Afghanistan; NZ v Australia
  • 30 England v India
  • July 1 Sri Lanka v West Indies
  • 2 Bangladesh v India
  • 3 England v NZ
  • 4 Afghanistan v West Indies
  • 5 Pakistan v Bangladesh
  • 6 Sri Lanka v India
  • 6 Australia v South Africa
  • 9 First sf: 1st v 4th, Old Trafford
  • 11 Second sf: 2nd v 3rd, Edgbaston
  • 14 Final, Lord’s

Cricket World Cup Fun Facts

When the game slows or it begins to rain a few fun facts to throw into the conversation:

  • Australia became the first country to win three consecutive World Cup tournament in 2007.
  • Until now Australia has won five times, India and West Indies twice, and Pakistan and Sri Lanka once.
  • Sachin Tendulkar scored a total of 2278 runs from 1992 to 2011 which is the most by any batsman.
  • Chris Gayle and Marlon Samuels have the record of highest partnership (372 runs against Zimbabwe).
  • The most runs in a single tournament and most hundreds in World Cup history belong to Sachin Tendulkar.
  • Glenn McGrath has taken most wickets in the World Cup tournament (71).
  • Ricky Ponting holds the record for the most catches.

And if the Cricket World Cup 2019 is not the sport you want to celebrate or its rained off then there is always the women’s football world cup starting on 7th June as an alternative!

Published Date: 29th May 2019
Category: Blog, Events, News
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